Hootan Heydari

Hold...Held

26

July 2023

26

Jul

2023

18

Aug 2023

Gallery 1

Hold...Held

Hootan Heydari

26

July 2023

26

July

2023

18

August 2023

Gallery 1

What if the invisible became visible? Like the space in-between two hands locked in a handshake. And what if a photograph’s essence vanished when its two halves were separated? This is the essence of Hold…Held. Using air-drying clay, the artist and a loved one lock their hands in a gesture of connection, capturing the moment in an instant photo. The photo’s layers are then dissected, erasing the original image. The clay and photographic emulsion are merged to form an object that preserves only the ghostly remnants of the past.Initially conceived as Gestures of Kindness in 2019, this ongoing project has transformed into Hold…Held—a fusion of photography and sculpture. It seeks to convey information through sculptural objects, much like a photograph would.

What if the invisible became visible? Like the space in-between two hands locked in a handshake. And what if a photograph’s essence vanished when its two halves were separated? This is the essence of Hold…Held. Using air-drying clay, the artist and a loved one lock their hands in a gesture of connection, capturing the moment in an instant photo. The photo’s layers are then dissected, erasing the original image. The clay and photographic emulsion are merged to form an object that preserves only the ghostly remnants of the past.Initially conceived as Gestures of Kindness in 2019, this ongoing project has transformed into Hold…Held—a fusion of photography and sculpture. It seeks to convey information through sculptural objects, much like a photograph would.

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Hootan Heydari

Born in Tehran, Hootan moved to Australia via Italy and USA, arriving here in 1985. His early experiences of relocation have resulted in a profound interest in ideas of disruption, memory and flux. His work ranges across installation, performance, video and photography to explore the notions of home and belonging through the lens of an Iranian-Australian perspective. His use of materials is based on their personal and symbolic significance or cultural ties to his native home of Iran. Hootan’s practice is concerned with the relationships between memory, compulsion and futility.