Kaijern Koo, Madeleine Minack, Arthur Dimitriou & Lucy Wilson

Inanimate Assemblage

9

March 2023

9

Mar

2023

31

Mar 2023

Gallery 3

Inanimate Assemblage

Kaijern Koo, Madeleine Minack, Arthur Dimitriou & Lucy Wilson

9

March 2023

9

March

2023

31

March 2023

Gallery 3

Dug up from the forgotten ruins of urban environments, ‘Inanimate Assemblage’ depicts everyday objects elevated from below and re-examined as valued objects. Extending on Jane Bennets’ Vibrant Matter’ and theories from New Materialism, new ecologies form within the gallery space where matter assembles to become vibrant and alive.Empowering the theory that individualized objects titled as ‘trash’ may be afforded agency through processes of combination to become ‘treasure’. This allows the gallery to become a magical realm outside of prejudice, a sanctuary where notions of status afforded to humans or newly created items are removed and all objects or beings involved in actions of creation are deemed sentient. The dialogue formulated through the construction of works from discarded material reveals the flaws that exist within human exceptionalism. The obscene amounts of waste that humans produce from products initially deemed superior when they were first created, such as plastic packaging, electronics, and hard rubbish, are considered no more than an eyesore or inconvenience.By challenging the idea that people are more valuable than the environment, we exist in and consequently, that human-made substance is immediately superior to natural materials we in turn highlight that these said toxic and destructive objects must offer more than their immediate use. Indeed, a broken bike frame or shattered milk bottle is nothing more than rubbish to begin with, but our goal through using concepts implored by New Materialist theorists is that we hope to transform these passive, inanimate waste objects into an active form through actions that result in assemblage.

Dug up from the forgotten ruins of urban environments, ‘Inanimate Assemblage’ depicts everyday objects elevated from below and re-examined as valued objects. Extending on Jane Bennets’ Vibrant Matter’ and theories from New Materialism, new ecologies form within the gallery space where matter assembles to become vibrant and alive.Empowering the theory that individualized objects titled as ‘trash’ may be afforded agency through processes of combination to become ‘treasure’. This allows the gallery to become a magical realm outside of prejudice, a sanctuary where notions of status afforded to humans or newly created items are removed and all objects or beings involved in actions of creation are deemed sentient. The dialogue formulated through the construction of works from discarded material reveals the flaws that exist within human exceptionalism. The obscene amounts of waste that humans produce from products initially deemed superior when they were first created, such as plastic packaging, electronics, and hard rubbish, are considered no more than an eyesore or inconvenience.By challenging the idea that people are more valuable than the environment, we exist in and consequently, that human-made substance is immediately superior to natural materials we in turn highlight that these said toxic and destructive objects must offer more than their immediate use. Indeed, a broken bike frame or shattered milk bottle is nothing more than rubbish to begin with, but our goal through using concepts implored by New Materialist theorists is that we hope to transform these passive, inanimate waste objects into an active form through actions that result in assemblage.

No items found.

Kaijern Koo

Madeleine Minack

As an interdisciplinary artist primarily working in installation and sculpture, Minack practices derives from a process of accumulation. Collecting discarded found objects to produce small, intimate sculptures which reflect minute details of normally unnoticed everyday matter.

Arthur Dimitriou

My practice derives from both natural and urban ecosystems and is inspired by the interactions that co-exist between the two. Concentrating on the perpetual conversation that results from the shifting reciprocity that occurs as we alter surrounding environments, each installation explores a new consequence that results from the concertina of changes created from such intercessions.

Lucy Wilson

Lucy Wilson is interested in the uncertainty of subjective experience and the instability implicit in everyday modes of representation. Working with familiar, ready-made materials, my work engages failure, humour and the anticipatory as means for creating moments of slippage and revealing the constructive potential of indeterminacy and not knowing.