Seventh is an artist-run, non-profit gallery operating since 2000. Learn more about us and our programs, or read our latest news for what's on, online and IRL.

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Admin

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Working (through) Scores is a two-part community workshop program for diverse working-class artists facilitated by composer James Hazel. Over two sessions, we will explore a series of listening and composition approaches to making experimental scores, drawing on everyday sounds and technologies.

The aim is to share skills and sonic practice for artists from low-socioeconomic backgrounds, regardless of musical/or sound ability. If this resonates, please send a short EOI via email (text or sound recording) with a little bit of info about why this workshop might be relevant for you.

Relaxed, non-academic atmosphere. Tea and biscuits provided!

Please send EOI, along with any questions to James by Friday 12 July → precarioustexts@gmail.com

27

Jul

2024

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James Hazel

Working (through) Scores

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The outlaw tradition, those who live ‘outside the law’, has a rich and vivid history. In Australia, such bandits are known as bushrangers, immortalised in popular culture, celebrated through folk tales and elevated to a legendary, even mythical status. Equal parts hero and villain, the Bushranger is heralded as a champion of freedom, generally a radical opponent to 19th-century British governance and the inequality of the early colonies, turning to violence and thievery to balance the scales. Often working in small gangs or as solitary rouges, the Bushranger lived on the periphery of society, banished to the harsh outback in isolation from the collective pulse of rapidly expanding cities. What first started as an investigation into the role these characters play within Australian culture quickly evolved into a more personal exploration of isolation and grief as I travelled Australia in search of the spirit of these long-lost but far-from-forgotten men.

Travelling to the far reaches of the Australian deserts and bush, to the opal mining towns of New South Wales and South Australia, this project undertook a radical shift as I tried to reconcile my own feelings and emotional responses to these remote and energised places. Living on the road for weeks on end, I began to imagine the isolation, the silence, and the spaciousness these outlawed convicts must have felt, exiled from regular life and condemned to survival by any means possible. At its core, Bushranger Blue makes no attempt to paint an accurate narrative of the history of the Australian Bushrangers; instead, it functions as an inquiry into more perennial themes of loneliness, isolation, and ideas around the concept of home. By tracking the spirit of the outcast ranger through historical regions and remote communities of the outback, the images speak of a yearning for deep connection in the face of isolation.

This project and exhibition was made possible through The Pool Grant. An initiative of The Pool Collective, The Pool Grant was launched in 2010 as a means to support the development of emerging talent in the region. Since then, it has provided funding to twelve individual artists, as well as the first joint project in 2019.

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27

Jul

2024

Rory King

Bushranger Blue

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Making-do is the first exhibition in ‘Hot Compost Home Tour’, a home-based touring exhibition series curated by artists and gardeners in Naarm.

Curated by community gardener and textile practitioner Merri Cheyne, Making-do is an exhibition of a scrap quilt by Emily Simek, alongside Cheyne’s own domestic textiles in her lounge-room. The exhibition takes the format of a working group, where Cheyne invites friends to test out and further develop a pattern for a new blanket made from scrap materials. Pattern-testing is a group process where the design of the blanket, and home-based exhibition, is collectively tested out and reflected upon, through practices in making and doing.

The show explores how a home show might function in support of a household, ‘making-do’ in ways that are subsistent, frugal, and involve collective gestures of care. This reflects Cheyne’s approach to gardening and low impact living,

     …when I don’t have something, I’ve just got to adjust my expectations of what I need, I can just do without. You make-do with what you have, or you wait until the opportunity manifests itself – something on the street, in the op-shop, or someone gives it to you. Stuff does manifest, people do give you things you really really want, if you wait long enough, if you are patient. It’s about tamping down your desire for new stuff, thinking, is it really necessary? 

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Hot Compost Home Tour is an off-site exhibition series by Emily Simek in collaboration with Merri Cheyne, Anna Dunnill, Eric Jong, Mei Sun and Doug Webb. The home-based tour explores composting as an approach to exhibition practice. Using relational ethics as a framework, the project considers the conditions of the various exchanges that ‘create’ compost: how and where does it come to exist? How are different collaborators implicated? Instead of a purely material process, composting becomes about the work of relationships within systems of exchange.

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Jun

2024

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Merri Cheyne, Emily Simek

Making-do

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What's On

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2024

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2024

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Isabella Trimboli
Autumn Rites
Isabella Trimboli
Studio Residencies
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